Family Litigation Blog



10 April 2019

Delay in naturalization applications leads to litigation, Congressional inquiry

Amy Lenhert

The number of Applications for Naturalization submitted to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) went up by 25% from 2013 to 2017, and then saw a decline in 2018. The significant jump in the number of applications in 2016 alone contributed to a backlog in processing naturalization (N-400) ... Read More

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10 April 2019

Going to Tijuana to Uphold U.S. Law and International Law on Asylum

Helen A. Sklar

Since the 1980s, countless Central Americans have made the difficult decision to leave family, home and community, risking life and limb journeying across Mexico in hopes of reaching the safety of the United States.  The principal sending countries are El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala, known collectively as the Northern Triangle ... Read More

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10 April 2019

Effective Use of the Freedom of Information Act

Helen A. Sklar

A brief history of FOIA Signed into law in 1967, the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) was heralded as an iconic achievement on behalf of governmental transparency.  In light of the current attacks on the media and press freedom, it is worthwhile to remember that FOIA was enacted for the ... Read More

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10 April 2019

Immigration Consequences of Crimes: State of California Law Designed to Ensure Defendants are Meaningfully Informed

Taiyyeba Safri Skomra

The California legislature has a long history of enacting laws intended to protect immigrants from deportation based on state crimes. For example, since 1978, California has required judges to warn all defendants before accepting a plea of guilty or no contest that, for non-citizens, conviction could result in deportation or ... Read More

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13 March 2019

Immigration Consequences of Crimes: State of California Law Designed to Ensure Defendants are Meaningfully Informed

Taiyyeba Safri Skomra

The California legislature has a long history of enacting laws intended to protect immigrants from deportation based on state crimes. For example, since 1978, California has required judges to warn all defendants before accepting a plea of guilty or no contest that, for noncitizens, conviction could result in deportation or ... Read More

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8 February 2019

SGG in the News

On February 1, 2019, Nora Phillips, a lawyer at the forefront of providing legal services to asylum seekers and deportees in Tijuana, was detained and deported by Mexican authorities for reasons that the Mexican government has yet to specify.  At 11:30AM, when the call went out to immigration attorneys in ... Read More

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24 January 2019

Ninth Circuit Rejects Collateral Attack on Removal Orders

Amy Lenhert

The Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently published a decision upholding convictions for illegal reentry after removal despite the fact that the defendants were no longer removable as charged in their administrative proceedings. USA v. Martinez-Hernandez involves two men, Jose and Oscar, who entered the United States without ... Read More

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14 December 2018

USCIS Intensifies Focus on Denaturalization

Many people think that once they obtain U.S. citizenship through naturalization, their status as a U.S. citizen can never be lost.  It will come as a surprise to some to learn that U.S. citizenship can in fact be taken away or revoked by the government under certain circumstances. And the ... Read More

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14 December 2018

Obtaining a Waiver to the Trump Travel Ban

David Strashnoy

On June 26, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the legality of Travel Ban 3.0 in its consideration of Trump v. Hawaii. Travel Ban 3.0 indefinitely restricts and/or suspends travel of individuals from the following countries to the United States: Iran, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria, Venezuela and Yemen. A ... Read More

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14 December 2018

Detention of Minors: The lasting impact of Flores v. Reno

Amy Lenhert

Earlier this year, the Trump administration announced a so-called “zero tolerance” policy on illegal entry into the United States, requiring the criminal prosecution of all individuals who enter the United States without authorization.  The results of this draconian policy were cruel and severe.  Thousands of children were forcibly separated from ... Read More

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